Introduction

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Data types and nodes

GeoData Manager has over 150 data types or nodes. This and subsequent sections of the help guide:

Choosing the correct data type to use

  1. Choose the correct data type category or node to use from the table below, according to the kind of data you want to work with

  2. and follow the link in the table below to choose the correct data type to use.

For this kind of data Choose this category or node
Mechanical data for actual and planned wells and drilling Wells and drilling
Any discharge test See below
P, T and flow time-based data during development (downhole PT, transient monitor & discharge) Reservoir
The results of tracer tests (chemical & radioactive) Tracer
Interpreted data for the geothermal system: Interpreted
The results of down hole logging (not downhole T, P or flow logs) Downholehole Logging
Pressure, temperature and flow time-based data collected during production Steamfield
Power plant data and measurements: Power Plant
Results of chemical analyses (geothermal fluid, soil, not rocks) Chemistry
Geological data from wells & field sites (has rock properties & chemistry) Geology
Geophysical data (resistivity, gravity, MT) Geophysics


GeoData Manager can work with external simulation applications:

Application Choose this category or node
TOUGH2 Simulation - TOUGH2
TETRAD Simulation - TETRAD


Data types used internally by GeoData Manager:

Kind of data Choose this category or node
Values that will appear in drop-down menus Lookups
Cross sections across a geothermal system Cross sections
Groups of wells or sample sites Groups
Data integrity checks Data Integrity Checks
Log of database transactions Logs
Log of database upgrades Read more



The relation between a node and its sub-nodes

Go to GeoData Manager's home window, click File, click Expand All Tree Nodes to see at the left of the window:

The nodes at the tips of the tree's branches (on the right) correspond to data types and the nodes to the left of the tips correspond to data type categories, which are just convenient groups of data types. The database tree is presented to you like a tree (with branches and nodes), rather than a list of all the data types, for three main reasons:

1 - For convenience of selecting data sets

To get to a particular data type, for example downhole pressure data for development wells, it is quicker to double-click Reservoir, then double-click Downhole PT, then click Pressure Data than to scroll through a list of about 150 data types and click one.

2 - To work with similar data types

In several places, nodes at the tip of the branches are similar and you can work with all such nodes at the node to the left. For example:

3 - To work with data sets in different ways

Sometimes, two nodes display the same data, but the data is presented differently at each node. Use whichever node lets you work with the data more easily. For example in Geology there are two nodes for the core register:

Other similar pairs of nodes are:

4 - To enter data in a data set that has more than one detail table

Note that in these cases you create a new data set at the higher node using New, then go to the sub-node and enter the detail data using Edit.



Sites

A site is the location of a field in space. GeoData Manager can find the location in space of every field in one of two ways:

  1. Some data types are called sites and have a location. The sub-nodes of the node Cross-Sections are the data types that are sites (though the data at these sub-nodes does not show the location; you need to go to the data types themselves to see this). All sites are a single point (eg Chemistry: Sample Site) except for wells, which store the wellhead location and the deviation information.

  2. For all other data types, you must enter a site as part of the header data, and GeoData Manager looks up the location of the site when required. For example, for a downhole pressure test, you enter a well for the test; GeoData Manager uses the depth of each measurement and the well's wellhead location and the deviation information to calculate or interpolate the location of that measurement down the well.

Note:



Discharge test data types/nodes

Types of discharge test

GeoData Manager can store discharge tests for four occasions:

  1. Pressure drawdown tests on development wells:

    These are transient tests made on discharging wells. We recommend that these tests are reserved for data from wells discharging at a fairly steady rate, thus giving a classic pressure drawdown response. Data from wells with varying discharge due to cycling or output adjustments, might be better entered as an ordinary discharge test, below.

  2. Discharge tests for development wells:

    If the well has a reasonably constant mass flow, it may be better entered as a pressure drawdown test, above.

    If the well is discharged at a number of distinct flow rates, these can be entered as a single discharge test or a number of separate discharge tests. Even if a well is closed for a period within a discharge test, the pressure data during the shut-in can be included as part of the discharge test (with the flow rate set to zero), or as a separate monitoring test.

  3. Discharge tests for a production wells

  4. Reinjection measurements for a production wells

Discharge test calculations

A discharge test's measurements can be either:

When you enter a discharge test's results, you will normally not have measured every parameter, and GeoData Manager will calculate the others. There are about 20 kinds of discharge test, according to what parameters you have measured and weather you have direct or indirect measurements.

GeoData Manager does three kinds of calculation:

  1. For any indirect flow measurements from instruments, calculate actual flow measurements.

  2. From the the measured separation pressure plus any two of brine flow, steam flow, total mass flow or enthalpy, GeoData Manager calculates the other two fields.

  3. For a specified well head pressure, total mass flow is not affected by separation pressure. You can look at the effect of changing separation pressure to something different from your measured one and GeoData Manager will recalculate the brine and steam flows, keeping the total mass flow the same.

Other, optional, fields to record measurements, for example Wellhead Pressure and Wellhead Temperature.

One or two separators

You can enter results from discharge tests through two separators. In this case, as described below, set Configuration to Double and use Weirbox ID (1 or 2) to distinguish the data from the two separators.

Discharge test fields

A discharge test's other fields include:

Pressure drawdown test fields:

Choosing a node to use for a discharge test

There are three cases; choose the appropriate one:

Editing or working with a discharge you have already entered

Occasion of discharge test Go to this node
Pressure drawdown, development well Reservoir: Pressure drawdown
Discharge test, development well Reservoir: Discharge
Discharge test, production well Steamfield: Production
Reinjection measurement, production well Steamfield: Reinjection

Entering a new discharge when you have values for the flows and maybe enthalpy

1 - Look in this table to find a value of FType to use:

Phase Kind of measurements you have Value of FType
1 Brine flow and temperature 1
2 Steam & brine flow, separation pressure 2
2 Brine flow, enthalpy, separation pressure B
1 Dry steam: flow, temperature, pressure or WHP D
- Incomplete Data N
2 Steam flow, enthalpy, separation pressure S
2 Total flow, enthalpy, separation pressure T

Note:

2 - Choose a node to use:

Occasion of discharge test Choose this node
Pressure drawdown, development well Reservoir: Pressure drawdown
Discharge test, development well Reservoir: Discharge
Discharge test, production well Steamfield: Production
Reinjection measurement, production well Steamfield: Reinjection

3 - Go to the node you chose in step 2 above and start entering a new data set; at the first window (New Data Identifiers), select from the dropdown list the value of FType you chose in step 1 above.

Entering a new discharge when you have indirect measurements of the flows, from field instruments

1 - Choose a node to use:

Occasion of discharge test Choose this node
Pressure drawdown, development well Reservoir: Pressure drawdown
Discharge test, development well Reservoir: Discharge
Discharge test, production well Steamfield: Production
Reinjection measurement, production well Steamfield: Reinjection

2 - Look in this table to choose the subnode to use:

Phase Kind of measurements you have Choose this subnode
1 Brine: upstream & differential orifice pressures Orifice (Brine Only)
2 Upstream & differential orifice pressures Orifice (Steam and Brine)
in separated steam & brine lines
1 Steam: upstream & differential orifice pressures Orifice (Dry Steam)
2 Lip pressure and weirbox measurement Lip Pressure and Weir
2 Lip pressure & estimated enthalpy Lip Pressure and Est. Enthalpy
1 Lip pressure for dry steam discharge Lip Pressure (Dry Steam)
2 Upstream & differential orifice pressures (for Murdock's equation) Murdock
2 Weirbox measurements for brine flow and upstream & differential steam orifice pressures Weir and Steam Orifice
1 Weirbox measurements for a brine flow Weir (Brine Only)
2 Weirbox measurements, estimated enthalpy Weir and Estimated Enthalpy

Note:

3 - Go to the node you chose in step 1 above, choose the subnode of that node that you chose in step 2 above and start entering a new data set.

4 - At the at the first window (New Data Identifiers), the fields to enter may include:

Click OK to go on to the edit window.

5 - At the edit window: